The Cartoon Art Museum

San Francisco

pizza-party:

gameraboy:

The very first Peanuts strip, October 2, 1950

It ain’t easy being Charlie Brown.

(via spx)

SEPTEMBER CARTOONIST-IN-RESIDENCE:ROBINSON EDGARThe Cartoon Art Museum will host artist Robinson Edgar on Saturday, September 20, 2014 from 1-3 pm as part of its ongoing Cartoonist-in-Residence program. Visitors will be given the chance to talk to Robinson, view and discuss his work. This event is free and open to the public.Robinson Edgar is a Bay Area based cartoonist and illustrator. After graduating from California College of the Arts, his work has been featured in the works of online magazine Thünk (A) and the performances of multimedia dance group Kinetech.  He is also the creator of a short series of comedic animations featured on his YouTube channel. His work is influenced by the works of Walt Kelly, Dan O’Neill and Vaughn Bode. His other interests include music, gaming and film. You can find more of his work at: http://www.robinsonedgar.comAbout the Cartoonist in Residence Program:The Cartoon Art Museum regularly hosts professional cartoonists in its galleries as part of its Cartoonist-in-Residence program. Museum patrons see cartoonists at work on their latest projects and learn everything you ever wanted to know about cartoonists – but were afraid to ask. Past featured Cartoonists-in-Residence include Paul Madonna (All Over Coffee), Keith Knight (K Chronicles, (th)ink), Paige Braddock (Jane’s World), Roman Muradov (The New Yorker) and Jimmy Gownley (Amelia Rules), among many others.

SEPTEMBER CARTOONIST-IN-RESIDENCE:
ROBINSON EDGAR

The Cartoon Art Museum will host artist Robinson Edgar on Saturday, September 20, 2014 from 1-3 pm as part of its ongoing Cartoonist-in-Residence program. Visitors will be given the chance to talk to Robinson, view and discuss his work. This event is free and open to the public.

Robinson Edgar is a Bay Area based cartoonist and illustrator. After graduating from California College of the Arts, his work has been featured in the works of online magazine Thünk (A) and the performances of multimedia dance group Kinetech.  He is also the creator of a short series of comedic animations featured on his YouTube channel. His work is influenced by the works of Walt Kelly, Dan O’Neill and Vaughn Bode. His other interests include music, gaming and film. You can find more of his work at: http://www.robinsonedgar.com

About the Cartoonist in Residence Program:
The Cartoon Art Museum regularly hosts professional cartoonists in its galleries as part of its Cartoonist-in-Residence program. Museum patrons see cartoonists at work on their latest projects and learn everything you ever wanted to know about cartoonists – but were afraid to ask. Past featured Cartoonists-in-Residence include Paul Madonna (All Over Coffee), Keith Knight (K Chronicles, (th)ink), Paige Braddock (Jane’s World), Roman Muradov (The New Yorker) and Jimmy Gownley (Amelia Rules), among many others.

thebristolboard:

Gallery of original covers by Stan Goldberg from The New Millie the Model, published by Marvel Comics, April 1958 - February 1969.

cracked:

An amazing tribute to an amazing comedian. Rest in peace, Joan. Sorry this caption’s kinda sappy. (via @newyorkermag)

By Benjamin Schwartz, the New Yorker daily cartoon. We miss you, Joan.

cracked:

An amazing tribute to an amazing comedian. Rest in peace, Joan. Sorry this caption’s kinda sappy. (via @newyorkermag)

By Benjamin Schwartz, the New Yorker daily cartoon. We miss you, Joan.

archiecomics:

STAN GOLDBERG 1932-2014

It is with great sadness that we learn of the passing of longtime Archie Comics artist Stan Goldberg. We send our deepest condolences to the Goldberg family, their friends and Stan’s fans. 

A fixture of Archie Comics for over 40 years, Stan’s work at Archie included lengthy stints on titles like Archie, Life with Archie, Betty and Me, Laugh, Pep Comics, Sabrina and the Archie newspaper strip, to name but a few.

"Stan was a pro, and he really helped define these characters while he was here, from his earliest work to the hit Archie Wedding story five years ago," said Archie Comics Editor-in-Chief, Victor Gorelick, who has worked at the company for over 56 years and edited Stan’s best-known work. "He was one of our go-to guy for decades. That’s nearly unheard of in comics, and Stan made it look easy. He will be missed by the entire comic book industry."

Stan was also known for his work during the early days of Marvel Comics and DC Comics. He was awarded the Inkpot Award in 1994 for his work at Archie.

Our condolences go out to the family and friends of Stan Goldberg. He will be very missed.

thebristolboard:

Happy 97th birthday to the King!
Original presentation piece by Jack Kirby (pencils) and Mike Royer (inks), circa 1978, which was part of a series of designs Kirby created for a film adaptation of Roger Zelazny’s science-fiction novel, The Lord of Light. 

thebristolboard:

Happy 97th birthday to the King!

Original presentation piece by Jack Kirby (pencils) and Mike Royer (inks), circa 1978, which was part of a series of designs Kirby created for a film adaptation of Roger Zelazny’s science-fiction novel, The Lord of Light

thebristolboard:

colsmi:

Just lovely: Roger Langridge’s The Kirby Alphabet, with everyone from Kamandi to the Puppet Master, Big Barda to the King himself. (As first published in the UKCAC98 booklet.)

Happy Kirby Day!

thebristolboard:

colsmi:

Just lovely: Roger Langridge’s The Kirby Alphabet, with everyone from Kamandi to the Puppet Master, Big Barda to the King himself. (As first published in the UKCAC98 booklet.)

Happy Kirby Day!

seanhowe:

JACK KIRBY IN CONTEXT

Two years ago, Jack Kirby’s granddaughter Jillian launched Kirby4Heroes, a campaign to raise funds for the Hero Initiative, which helps comic artists in need. On the Kirby4Heroes Facebook page, Jillian posted several vintage pictures of her grandfather.

I thought it would be illuminating to provide a guide to what Kirby was working on at the time of each photo. Sometimes we forget that personal and professional lives don’t exist in vacuums.

(1) July 1941: Only months after the introduction of Captain America, Kirby and Joe Simon would soon leave Timely Comics. Jack and Roz Kirby spent a day at Brighton Beach.

(2) May 1961: Fantastic Four #1 was in development. It would hit newsstands on August 8. Bar Mitzvah for Neal Kirby.

(3) December 1963. Avengers #4, featuring the return of Captain America, was on newsstands. Tales of Suspense #52, featuring the first appearance of Black Widow, was at the printers. The growing Kirby family celebrated Hanukkah.

(4) July 1965: The debuts of the Inhumans (in Fantastic Four) and the Sentinels (in X-Men) were in production.

(5) June 1966: The fully-Kirby-scripted S.H.I.E.L.D. story in Strange Tales #148 hit newsstands (along with all of these). “I [did] a little editing later, but it was [Jack’s] story.” Lee said in an interview. Neal Kirby graduated.

On July 12, after Joe Simon began efforts to claim sole ownership of Captain America, Martin Goodman persuaded Jack Kirby to sign a deposition stating that Captain America, and all the work he’d done for Timely in the early 40s, was done with the understanding that it “belonged to Timely.”


(You can read much more about this in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.)

All images ©
2013 by Connie, Neal and Jillian Kirby.