The Cartoon Art Museum

San Francisco
spx:

Small Press Expo Announces 2014 Ignatz Award Nominees
The Small Press Expo the preeminent showcase for the exhibition of independent comics, graphic novels and alternative political cartoons, is pleased to announce the 2014 nominees for the annual presentation of the Ignatz Awards, a celebration of outstanding achievement in comics and cartooning.
The Ignatz, named after George Herriman’s brick-wielding mouse from his long running comic strip Krazy Kat, recognizes exceptional work that challenges popular notions of what comics can achieve, both as an art form and as a means of personal expression. 
The Ignatz Awards are a festival prize, the first of such in the United States comic book industry.  Only those present at the Small Press Expo may cast a vote to decide the winners.
The nominees for this year’s ballot were determined by a panel of five of the best of today’s comic artists, Darryl Ayo, Austin English, Melissa Mendes, Thien Pham and Whit Taylor, with the votes cast for the awards by the attendees during SPX.
The Ignatz Awards will be presented at the gala Ignatz Awards ceremony held on Saturday, September 13, 2014 at 9:30 PM, to be followed by libations, chocolate fountains, our first SPX Prom and a few as yet unannounced surprises. 
Last year’s winner of the Ignatz Award for Promising New Talent - and also a 2014 nominee - Sam Alden created this year’s rendition of Ignatz the mouse featured at the top of this post.

spx:

Small Press Expo Announces 2014 Ignatz Award Nominees

The Small Press Expo the preeminent showcase for the exhibition of independent comics, graphic novels and alternative political cartoons, is pleased to announce the 2014 nominees for the annual presentation of the Ignatz Awards, a celebration of outstanding achievement in comics and cartooning.

The Ignatz, named after George Herriman’s brick-wielding mouse from his long running comic strip Krazy Kat, recognizes exceptional work that challenges popular notions of what comics can achieve, both as an art form and as a means of personal expression.

The Ignatz Awards are a festival prize, the first of such in the United States comic book industry.  Only those present at the Small Press Expo may cast a vote to decide the winners.

The nominees for this year’s ballot were determined by a panel of five of the best of today’s comic artists, Darryl Ayo, Austin English, Melissa Mendes, Thien Pham and Whit Taylor, with the votes cast for the awards by the attendees during SPX.

The Ignatz Awards will be presented at the gala Ignatz Awards ceremony held on Saturday, September 13, 2014 at 9:30 PM, to be followed by libations, chocolate fountains, our first SPX Prom and a few as yet unannounced surprises. 

Last year’s winner of the Ignatz Award for Promising New Talent - and also a 2014 nominee - Sam Alden created this year’s rendition of Ignatz the mouse featured at the top of this post.

thechronologicalsuperman:

More Fun Comics #101 - Cover date January-February 1945
Not since the launch of Superman in 1938 had there been such an important new creation in the Man of Steel’s personal franchise - the introduction of Superboy.
Siegel had previously pitched Superboy series on two other occasions, in 1938 and 1940, but it was only in 1944 - when Siegel was serving overseas - that plans were put into action. In early 1945, the Boy of Steel debuted without Siegel’s permission or management. It was a turning point in the already-contentious relationship between Siegel and Jack Liebowitz, National’s publisher, who appeared to be wresting complete control of the franchise while its co-creator was called away.
The ownership issue of Superboy eventually led to the courts, with Siegel retrieving his rights to the character from National - but allowing them to continue publishing the character as the owner. Never a savvy defender of his legal rights as much as his ethical rights, Siegel effectively signed away Superboy in the wake of having just won him back.
As for Superboy himself, he debuts to almost no fanfare at all - not only is he not featured on the cover, but he’s not even mentioned (alongside co-inhabitants Johnny Quick, Aquaman, Spectre, the comedy team of Dover and Clover, and the book’s foremost attraction, Green Arrow).
In a terse, five-page retelling of Superman’s (and now Superboy’s) origin, we see more of Krypton than any other comic has yet shown, as well as what is very likely the first image of a pleasant, aged Kent couple doting over their lovable, adopted super-infant. 
Rather than being encouraged by his dying father to mask his great powers behind a meek disguise in order to better serve humanity, it’s young Clark who determines that he must hide his light under a bushel. 
Although the brief tale doesn’t leave much room for nuance, it’s also insinuated that Clark invents his Superboy identity out of whole cloth - as he does his costume, which he sews himself (predating the home-ec handiness of Peter Parker by a couple of decades).
Obviously, there’s little in the way of canon in these early stories - the radio serial alone has upended Superman’s origin for its own purposes, at the very least - but Superboy’s presence will dramatically change all sorts of assumptions about the character of his older self, in short order. 

thechronologicalsuperman:

More Fun Comics #101 - Cover date January-February 1945

Not since the launch of Superman in 1938 had there been such an important new creation in the Man of Steel’s personal franchise - the introduction of Superboy.

Siegel had previously pitched Superboy series on two other occasions, in 1938 and 1940, but it was only in 1944 - when Siegel was serving overseas - that plans were put into action. In early 1945, the Boy of Steel debuted without Siegel’s permission or management. It was a turning point in the already-contentious relationship between Siegel and Jack Liebowitz, National’s publisher, who appeared to be wresting complete control of the franchise while its co-creator was called away.

The ownership issue of Superboy eventually led to the courts, with Siegel retrieving his rights to the character from National - but allowing them to continue publishing the character as the owner. Never a savvy defender of his legal rights as much as his ethical rights, Siegel effectively signed away Superboy in the wake of having just won him back.

As for Superboy himself, he debuts to almost no fanfare at all - not only is he not featured on the cover, but he’s not even mentioned (alongside co-inhabitants Johnny Quick, Aquaman, Spectre, the comedy team of Dover and Clover, and the book’s foremost attraction, Green Arrow).

In a terse, five-page retelling of Superman’s (and now Superboy’s) origin, we see more of Krypton than any other comic has yet shown, as well as what is very likely the first image of a pleasant, aged Kent couple doting over their lovable, adopted super-infant. 

Rather than being encouraged by his dying father to mask his great powers behind a meek disguise in order to better serve humanity, it’s young Clark who determines that he must hide his light under a bushel. 

Although the brief tale doesn’t leave much room for nuance, it’s also insinuated that Clark invents his Superboy identity out of whole cloth - as he does his costume, which he sews himself (predating the home-ec handiness of Peter Parker by a couple of decades).

Obviously, there’s little in the way of canon in these early stories - the radio serial alone has upended Superman’s origin for its own purposes, at the very least - but Superboy’s presence will dramatically change all sorts of assumptions about the character of his older self, in short order. 

Mopsy #1 (1948), by Gladys Parker. In a 1946 article with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Parker explained, “I got the idea for Mopsy when the cartoonist Rube Goldberg said my hair looked like a mop.”

Mopsy #1 (1948), by Gladys Parker. In a 1946 article with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Parker explained, “I got the idea for Mopsy when the cartoonist Rube Goldberg said my hair looked like a mop.”

(Source: publicdomaindrivein)

Rest in peace, Robin Williams. He was an international icon, but also our San Francisco neighbor, and a great friend of cartoonists and animators worldwide.

Rest in peace, Robin Williams. He was an international icon, but also our San Francisco neighbor, and a great friend of cartoonists and animators worldwide.

It’s a space-themed Sunday Storytime Hour at the Cartoon Art Museum! For preschoolers, kindergarteners and parents, but all ages are welcome for story reading and fun art activities. Plus, you get to enjoy the museum’s current exhibits, including Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, all for the regular admission price. Jump in your rocket and join us on Sunday, August 17, from 11am to 12pm.

It’s a space-themed Sunday Storytime Hour at the Cartoon Art Museum! For preschoolers, kindergarteners and parents, but all ages are welcome for story reading and fun art activities. Plus, you get to enjoy the museum’s current exhibits, including Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, all for the regular admission price. Jump in your rocket and join us on Sunday, August 17, from 11am to 12pm.

comicbookcovers:

Hanna-Barbera TV Stars #3, December 1978, cover by Alex Toth

comicbookcovers:

Hanna-Barbera TV Stars #3, December 1978, cover by Alex Toth

Don’t forget to attend our opening reception and book signing for Pretty in Ink: The Trina Robbins Collection, tonight, Thursday, July 31, 2014 from 6-8 pm. Pretty In Ink author Trina Robbins will guide a personal docent tour beginning at 6:30 pm, and will be signing copies of her book. This is a free event, so come and see a great exhibit and meet a comics legend!
Art above by Marcia Snyder, from Jungle Comics #163 (1954)

Don’t forget to attend our opening reception and book signing for Pretty in Ink: The Trina Robbins Collection, tonight, Thursday, July 31, 2014 from 6-8 pm. Pretty In Ink author Trina Robbins will guide a personal docent tour beginning at 6:30 pm, and will be signing copies of her book. This is a free event, so come and see a great exhibit and meet a comics legend!

Art above by Marcia Snyder, from Jungle Comics #163 (1954)

CARTOON ART MUSEUM’S THIRD THURSDAY PRESENTS: TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLESShow your Turtle Power at the Cartoon Art Museum! August’s Third Thursday on Thursday, August 21, from 5-8 pm. The event will feature a docent tour by Andrew Farago, Cartoon Art Museum curator and author of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History, published by Insight Editions. Watch local sketch artists draw, dress like a turtle for a picture, and enjoy drinks at the Cartoon Art Museum. This event is free and open to the public.About the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles exhibition: The Cartoon Art Museum’s exhibition celebrates the iconic hit franchise Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and includes all of the original artwork from the historic first issue from 1984, other early covers and interior artwork from series creators Kevin Eastman & Peter Laird and their associates from Mirage Studios, storyboards and animation cells from the original 1980s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles television series and material from the popular TMNT Adventures comic book originally published by Archie Comics. This retrospective is on display at the museum through Sept. 14, 2014. About Third Thursdays: Third Thursdays occurs every month of the year in the Yerba Buena neighborhood of San Francisco, involving galleries and museums extending their hours throughout the neighborhood to create a lively atmosphere of arts and interaction. For more information, see http://www.thirdthursdaysf.wordpress.com.

CARTOON ART MUSEUM’S THIRD THURSDAY PRESENTS:
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES

Show your Turtle Power at the Cartoon Art Museum! August’s Third Thursday on Thursday, August 21, from 5-8 pm. The event will feature a docent tour by Andrew Farago, Cartoon Art Museum curator and author of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History, published by Insight Editions. Watch local sketch artists draw, dress like a turtle for a picture, and enjoy drinks at the Cartoon Art Museum. This event is free and open to the public.

About the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles exhibition:
The Cartoon Art Museum’s exhibition celebrates the iconic hit franchise Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and includes all of the original artwork from the historic first issue from 1984, other early covers and interior artwork from series creators Kevin Eastman & Peter Laird and their associates from Mirage Studios, storyboards and animation cells from the original 1980s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles television series and material from the popular TMNT Adventures comic book originally published by Archie Comics. This retrospective is on display at the museum through Sept. 14, 2014.
 
About Third Thursdays:
Third Thursdays occurs every month of the year in the Yerba Buena neighborhood of San Francisco, involving galleries and museums extending their hours throughout the neighborhood to create a lively atmosphere of arts and interaction. For more information, see http://www.thirdthursdaysf.wordpress.com.

fantagraphics:

Lily Renée and Trina Robbins are signing Pretty in Ink until noon! Legendary women in comics! www.fantagraphics.com/prettyinink

Heads up, San Diego Comic-Con attendees: find both of these Pretty in Ink legends at the show!

fantagraphics:

Lily Renée and Trina Robbins are signing Pretty in Ink until noon! Legendary women in comics! www.fantagraphics.com/prettyinink


Heads up, San Diego Comic-Con attendees: find both of these Pretty in Ink legends at the show!

PRETTY IN INK RECEPTION
THURSDAY, JULY 31, 2014, 6- 8pm

The Cartoon Art Museum proudly presents Pretty In Ink: The Trina Robbins Collection, featuring highlights from the personal archives of legendary comics herstorian Trina Robbins. The opening reception and book signing for this exhibition will take place on Thursday, July 31, 2014 from 6pm to 8pm. Pretty In Ink author Trina Robbins will guide a personal docent tour beginning at 6:30 pm, and will be signing copies of her book. This event is free and open to the public.

Pretty In Ink, published by Fantagraphics Books, is a revised, updated and rewritten history of North-American women cartoonists, building upon previous award-winning histories written by Robbins. The Cartoon Art Museum’s retrospective of the same name has been assembled from Robbins’s own archives, and features many of the top women cartoonists from the early 20th century, including Ethel Hays, Edwina Dumm, Nell Brinkley, Ramona Fradon, and Lily Renée. Original artwork, rare photographs, and other memorabilia are included in this historic retrospective. (Pictured above: a frame from the comic strip Pat and Judy by Dorothy Hughes.)

Are you at San Diego Comic-Con this year? Come visit our booth at #1930 on the convention floor, right next to Neal Adams and Oni Press, just across the way from Sideshow Collectibles.

You can meet our curator, Andrew Farago (when he’s not moderating a panel, talking to editors, or signing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History at the Insight Editions booth, #1318) plus a host of guest artists sketching at our table for small donations to the museum. (Note to artists at Comic-Con: schedules change, and we sometimes have open seats, so if you’re interested in dropping in and drawing some on-the-spot commissions with us at the Cartoon Art Museum booth, stop on by and help us raise some money for the museum!)

Happy Birthday to Lynda Carter!

Happy Birthday to Lynda Carter!